by Grand Master
Grand Master

Why do I need a landline phone?

Many users get their Broadband & don't give a thought to the landline, despite without it they wouldn't have BB. Then the BB starts playing up often due to the phone never being used on the landline.

 

After long periods without any electric current passing down the line, joints can become oxidised & corroded. This could impair the Broadband sharing the same line.

 

So, it's worth buying a cheap corded handset, which can often be had for about £5, & making the occasional call to "wet" the line. Also having a handset is invaluable for helping diagnose Broadband faults. This could well save you the cost (£50 from EE or upto £85 for other ISPs) of an engineer call-out finding the fault lay within your home.

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If you think I helped please feel free to hit the "Thumbs Up" button below.

To phone EE: The local rate landline number +44 207 362 0200 or Freephone +44 800 079 8586 - Option 1 for Mobiles; Option 2 for 4G WiFi; Option 3 for Home Broadband & EE TV.

ISPs: 1999: Freeserve 48K Dial-Up => 2005: Wanadoo 1 Meg BB => 2007: Orange 2 Meg BB => 2008: Orange 8 Meg LLU => 2010: Orange 16 Meg LLU => 2011: Orange 20 Meg WBC => 2014: EE 20 Meg WBC
5 REPLIES 5
by
EE Community Support Team

Re: Why do I need a landline phone?

This is great @XRaySpeX 

 

I am going to look at this myself.

 

Thank you 

 

Richard

 

🙂

by R-ainbow24 Contributor
Contributor

Re: Why do I need a landline phone?

Not made a landline call in years in fact don’t even think it’s plugged in anymore so this confused me - if it’s running thru  same earthier/cable surely being on the phone your blocking that signal line? (Broadband?) 

Highlighted
by Grand Master
Grand Master

Re: Why do I need a landline phone?

No, @R-ainbow24 , BB & voice use completely different ranges of frequencies. There's no overlap.

__________________________________________________________________________________________
If you think I helped please feel free to hit the "Thumbs Up" button below.

To phone EE: The local rate landline number +44 207 362 0200 or Freephone +44 800 079 8586 - Option 1 for Mobiles; Option 2 for 4G WiFi; Option 3 for Home Broadband & EE TV.

ISPs: 1999: Freeserve 48K Dial-Up => 2005: Wanadoo 1 Meg BB => 2007: Orange 2 Meg BB => 2008: Orange 8 Meg LLU => 2010: Orange 16 Meg LLU => 2011: Orange 20 Meg WBC => 2014: EE 20 Meg WBC
by Skilled Contributor
Skilled Contributor

Re: Why do I need a landline phone?

For some reason this came up in my timeline as @XRaySpeX must have made an edit so maybe I can update it slightly.

 

Ringing a phone occasionally does not "Wet" a line as such. It can help on breaking down oxidisation on joints as it puts through a higher than "wetting current".

 

Having a handset plugged in will supply a closed low voltage wetting current without even using it. Although this wouldn't make much difference to ADSL lines due to the frequencies involved it has a beneficial effect to VDSL lines.

 

Not only that but for diagnostics a handset is the cheapest (£5-£10) most simple diagnostic tool available.

 

By far the bigget cause of VDSL signal drop out is noise on the line, it is a killer for VDSL. Add to that your broadband will work, albeit at a slower rate if only one of the pairs of wires is connected. A handset will quickly tell you where the issue is and allow you to either report a phone line problem (quicker resolution) or a broadband one. Openreach have more line engineers than broadband ones presently and they are different fault queues, both have the same SLA's (Service Level Agreements) but different engineer availability. This means line problems are normally rectifide quicker.

 

A line engineer cannot request a DLM reset unlike a broadband one but once the line issue is resolved DLM will normally reprofile the line within a few days automatically.

 

So how to use your hand set to diagnose the problem.

First, do youhave a dial tone? If no report a no dial tone fault.

Second dial 17070 option 2 is there noise on the line? If yes then you need to rule out any internal wiring fault by connecting the phone to the test socket with a filter and checking again. Be aware this is only with split master sockets and the newer ones have an interstatial plate which also must be removed (see photo).mk 3 nte all parts.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

by Skilled Contributor
Skilled Contributor

Re: Why do I need a landline phone?

Couldn't edit my post but I've found the reference for wetting current.

 

"A related term sealing current (aka wetting current or fritt current) is widely used in the telecommunication industry describing a small constant DC current (typically 1-20 mA) in copper wire loops in order to avoid contact oxidation of contacts and splices. It is defined in ITU-T G.992.3 for "all digital mode ADSL" as a current flowing from the ATU-C (ADSL Linecard) via the phone lines to the ATU-R (CPE)."

 

Source

 

Having a phone plugged in assists this.

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